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Saturday, April 19, 2014

Carol Goar: Natural catastrophes mount while Harper shrugs (in The Toronto Star)

"As scientists produce ever more evidence that climate change is disrupting the atmosphere, causing more floods, droughts, storm surges, wildfires, landslides, extreme cold snaps and deadly heat waves, Canada’s financiers are beginning to sound the alarm. ...

"What [the Toronto Dominion Bank's report entitled Natural Catastrophes: A Canadian Perspective] aims to do is persuade policy-makers, business leaders and individuals in Canada to mitigate the impact of the climate upheavals that are already happening or foreseeable.

"Most of the provinces are already taking steps to limit the damage. Oil companies, automakers and homebuilders, likewise, are making adjustments. Only the federal government refuses to deviate from Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s full-steam-ahead approach to energy development.


Natural catastrophes mount while Harper shrugs: Goar | Toronto Star

Friday, April 11, 2014

Rick Salutin: The end of Mad Men and the era of ads (in The Toronto Star)

"What ever made anyone think news and ads could easily mix? It wasn’t always so. If you look at early newspapers, like William Lyon Mackenzie’s Colonial Advocate (Toronto in the 1830s), it’s a solid wall of news and opinion. The only ads are classified, from readers to readers, like the Internet. Ads came to dominate all other forms of income but it was an uncomfortable marriage; and it’s crazy to think the divorce won’t ultimately be a Good Thing, even if the stresses are agonizing now, especially for people working in journalism.

"Or TV. Who could imagine TV without ads, it was always ads. But the best TV ever, like Mad Men, was done for cable, with its alternate revenue stream, coming straight from viewers."

The end of Mad Men and the era of ads: Salutin | Toronto Star

Interesting article on the future of ads.

Sunday, April 6, 2014

Tony Burman: Climate change — time to wake up, smell the CO2 (in The Toronto Star)

"If hell on Earth doesn’t actually exist, the essential message from this week’s dramatic United Nations climate change report is that it one day might.

"And if that does happen, can I be the first to propose that its hottest corner be reserved for the political and media ideologues and “deniers” — including here in Canada — who act as if this fragile, overwhelmed planet is their own personal piggy bank from which to loot? ...

"The world’s nations are beginning to work toward a new international climate change protocol that would replace Kyoto. The crucial meeting will be in Paris at the end of 2015. Governments will gather there claiming some sort of mandate from their voters to determine the road ahead.

"Canada is scheduled to go the polls next year, shortly before this meeting is held.

"Isn’t this a great opportunity for Canadians as a people to reclaim our commitment to an environmental policy that truly serves our future generations?"


Climate change — time to wake up, smell the CO2: Burman | Toronto Star

Tony Burman, former head of Al-Jazeera English and CBC News, teaches journalism at Ryerson University. (tony.burman@gmail.com )

Friday, March 28, 2014

Carol Goar: Fighting for help for voiceless seniors (in The Toronto Star)

"Minoo Shakibai sometimes wants to weep as she examines a patient’s ulcerated feet. Many of the chiropodist’s clients are elderly and diabetic. They come to the Dufferin Foot Clinic thinking she can fix the “small cuts” on their feet.

"In severe cases, she sends them straight to the emergency department of the nearest hospital, knowing the lesions are gangrenous. In less urgent circumstances, she cleans and dresses their wounds and tells them to make an appointment with their family doctor immediately. Most don’t. ...

"Too often, the young chiropodist watches seniors — mostly Italian and Portuguese immigrants from the neighbourhood — walk out the door, knowing they’ll eventually face amputation.

"This month, she launched a one-woman crusade to raise public awareness and get help for seniors with no private health coverage. “They deserve to be taken care of and treated right,” she appealed to then-MP Olivia Chow, who passed her entreaty on to Shakibai’s federal representative, Andrew Cash, before launching her mayoral bid. He phoned Shakibai back and gently explained that health-care services are a provincial responsibility, promising to raise the issue with his counterpart at Queen’s Park, Jonah Schein.

"Shakibai doesn’t know much about politics, as she readily admits. She has no allies or advisers. She’s never spoken out before. But she can no longer remain silent."

Fighting for help for voiceless seniors: Goar | Toronto Star

A classic case of "penny-wise, pound-foolish".  If you've had a friend lose a foot because of an untreated ingrown toe-nail, it seems a no-brainer!

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Stephen Bede Scharper: Wrecking the climate is bad business | Toronto Star

"Last month, Trinity-St. Paul’s United Church unanimously voted to ensure that its own funds are not invested in the world’s 200 largest fossil fuel companies.

"The vote emerges from a growing concern over “climate justice,” which asserts that while wealthy industrialized nations are the most responsible for carbon emissions engendering climate change, the most destructive effects of climate change are often felt by impoverished groups who are the least responsible for global warming. ...

"As recent reporting by Carol Goar in these pages has suggested, the clean technology industry in Canada, with Ontario as its epicentre, now employs more than the forestry, aerospace and pharmaceutical industries, generating 2,300 jobs alone last year, upping the total number of jobs to 41,000. This industry spawns $5.8 billion in export revenues, is tops in research and development investment and exhibits promising resilience, continuing to show growth even during the 2008-2009 financial debacle.

"The fossil fuel divestment moves by Trinity St. Paul’s and the investment risks posed by climate change in the Mercer study both point to the wisdom of moving away from a climate changing, fossil fuel extracting economy to a life-affirming, clean and more equitable financial — and moral — environment.

"It turns out wrecking the climate is bad business all around."

Wrecking the climate is bad business | Toronto Star

Stephen Bede Scharper is associate professor of environment at the University of Toronto. 

Friday, March 21, 2014

Rick Salutin: Kathleen Wynne backs down from the great tax debate (in The Toronto Star)

"Another golden moment is slipping away. I don’t mean the Leafs (not only). I mean the Ontario election we might have had, the one about taxes, with a debate on what it means to be a society....

"... What makes us human? It’s our interconnectedness and interdependence. That conditions everything, from crossing a street to turning on a tap. We are webs of interconnection. Most good things cost money and taxes are how we monetize many of those mutual needs. Among good things are non-dehumanizing transit, decent schools, roads that don’t rise up to devour your car — the pensions issue bites because it raises those issues not just horizontally, in space, but vertically, through time, between generations. Everyone stretches out their hands to embrace and support everyone around them, often informally but sometimes via taxes paid. I’m for fairness and I hate the free ride the rich routinely get, but it’s more urgent to construct a social reality that serves most people than be sticklers for it all balancing out. Their time will come, eventually.

" ...One peculiar implication of this debate is that the best way to make taxes more acceptable is to raise them so that people see results, like better transit and pensions. They have to be high enough to accomplish something. That’s why high tax countries generally register fewer complaints than low tax places like us or the U.S. It makes perfect sense, since people who see fewer results rightly ask why they’re paying taxes. That’s the Harper-Ford formula: cut taxes, services languish, people don’t see the point and don’t wanna pay. Vote for me and I’ll cut your pointless, useless taxes.

" ...Alas, it wasn’t to be. ... I grant, reluctantly, it sounds savvier, but I’ll sorely miss the debate that didn’t happen and never may."

Kathleen Wynne backs down from the great tax debate: Salutin | Toronto Star

In my view Rick Salutin is saying some very important things about the relationship between the individual and the state.

Thursday, March 20, 2014

Thomas J. Duck: Echoes of Walkerton in Environment Canada cuts (in The Toronto Star)

"In May 2000, the water system of Walkerton, Ont., suffered an E. coli outbreak that left nearly half the community’s 4,800 people ill. Seven died. ...

"Underlying the failures of the Walkerton PUC and the MOE, however, were government of Ontario cutbacks. How deep were the cuts? In the years leading up to the Walkerton tragedy, the MOE’s budget was reduced by 68 per cent and its staffing by 40 per cent. These numbers are comparable to what Environment Canada is experiencing today. Consider, for example, that Environment Canada’s climate change and clean air program is having its budget reduced by an astonishing 77 per cent. The cuts are so deep that they appear designed to break Environment Canada once and for all.

"It is interesting to note that three members of that Ontario government have played key roles in Stephen Harper’s federal cabinet: Jim Flaherty (the outgoing minister of finance), John Baird (minister of foreign affairs), and Tony Clement (president of the Treasury Board). Flaherty, Baird and Clement were there when Ontario’s cuts were made and witnessed the result. Surely they must see the parallels now. So why haven’t they spoken out about the dismantling of Environment Canada?"

Echoes of Walkerton in Environment Canada cuts | Toronto Star

Thomas J. Duck is an associate professor in the Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science at Dalhousie University.